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Jericho: The series that ended too soon

Did you ever watch the short-lived TV series Jericho? It lasted for one season way back in 2006. Due to the cult following a shorter season was created a little later to tie up the loose ends. Jericho was a small town in Kansas, and the residents were coming to grips with several American cities razed by nuclear bombs. The draw was in the dynamics of the town, how everyone reacted to the global catastrophe. Ordinary people in extraordinary circumstances. That was the draw. It was cool, it was post-apocalyptic, it ended way too soon.

I don’t watch much TV, but this was one show I enjoyed. And miss.

I wrote 25 Bombs Fell with Jericho’s basic idea in mind; how ordinary people react given extraordinary circumstances. It makes for great stories and drives so much of my work, delving into human interaction. Young and old. Black and white. Male and female. All those interesting things that makes living such an explosive enterprise.

It’s not a prepper post-apocalyptic, where everyone is an ex-beret/Navy Seal/retired covert ops. It’s about your local cable man suddenly thrust into becoming the leader of a fallout shelter. It’s about a white-collar city-boy from Atlanta finding himself having to fire a gun and tote back-breaking packs of supplies. Ordinary people.

25 Bombs Fell began life as a five-episode series, much like a television show. Each episode contains an encapsulated story, but still fits into the main story arc that runs through all episodes. It’s my best-selling book, by far. I guess many other people like the ordinary people scenario.

Currently I’m working on the second book to 25 Bombs Fell, which should be finished later in 2017. Until then, click on the cover to go to Amazon and pick up the first book. You might enjoy it.

The Wasteland Saga

My Review:
This review covers the third novel in the Wasteland Saga, The Road is a River. You can find my reviews for the first two parts Old Man Review and Savage Boy.

So if you read the two reviews you’ll know I’m a fan of the series and of the author. Even though this is the third part, Nick saves the best for last. In my humble opinion, Road is the best because it follows the Old Man and the Savage Boy and their entwined story, finishing their journeys.

But it’s the beauty through the destruction that is most remarkable. Through the lawlessness, through the savagery, there is still a remnant of individuals that realize there is more to the bombed-out life than the immediate situation. There are still things in the world worth sacrificing self for, and there are still some individuals that deem other lives more valuable than their own. Nick’s story weaves the idea of self-sacrifice into Road, making for a compelling read, one that transcends a typical post-apocalyptic story.

Every story should end with the message Nick has put into Road.

If you’re considering purchasing the Wasteland Saga, then take the plunge and pick it up, no matter the cost. It will be money well spent.

From the Indie Side

My Review:

I enjoy a good story. To help alleviate my ongoing dilemma of finding good stories, Michael Bunker, one of the featured authors in this anthology, provided me an Advance Review Copy of From the Indie Side (FTIS).

FTIS is an eclectic anthology of short stories, written by some of the premiere names in the indie author movement. Maybe you’ve heard of them, maybe not. Either way, the authors, for one reason or another, decided to self-publish their work, not going the “traditional” publishing route. This freedom of movement adds to the dynamic nature of the anthology.

Like any good collection of shorts, FTIS offers a wide range of styles and genres. From the looming planet on the cover (also designed by one of the authors-these guys and gals are talented), you get the impression that sci-fi is a common thread throughout the collection. While this is the case, sci-fi is where the similarity begins but also where it ends. Just as every author has their own voice, so every story carries its own unique vibe. If you’re looking for quirky, it’s there. You’ll also find young adult, post-apocalyptic, dystopia, and urban fantasy. Maybe even a vampire or two. Even though these terms can help define sub-genres, they only paint a one-dimensional portrait of the quality of writing. True to the indie initiative, the stories defy pigeon-holing into a simple genre or sub-genre. They are dynamic and entertaining, crossing conventional boundaries of typical, formulaic stories. That is the heart of indie. If this is what you’re looking for, then pick up a copy (download to Kindle) of FTIS.

What’s more, I enjoyed the author comments at the end of each story. Some talk of the inspiration for their story. Others provide a hint of an underlying idea woven in the fabric of the words (you know those authors, always planting subtle ideas in their stories). Each one speaks with pride for their work. You can feel the care and passion they put into their craft.

I have my own tastes. I liked some stories more than others and liked some writing styles more than others. But then, isn’t that the beauty of anthologies? You get to try and experience a wide range of authors. But as a whole, FTIS is a worthwhile, entertaining investment. So if you’ve heard of indie authors and have wondered what the buzz is about, then grab a copy of FTIS and see for yourself. You will not be disappointed, and you will mostly likely end up with a list of many more authors to follow.

The Savage Boy

A thrilling post apocalyptic adventure of the Boy, a ‘savage’ struggling to survive in a hostile, unforgiving world.

The Old Man and the Wasteland

A post apocalyptic story of a salvager, an old man that has passed his usefulness, or so his fellow salvagers think. He has a few more good days left in him.